2 loose llamas lassoed after running amok near Phoenix

In this image taken from video and provided by abc15.com, men lasso one of two quick-footed llamas after they dashed in and out of traffic before they were captured, Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015, in Sun City, Ariz., a Phoenix-area retirement community. The llamas thwarted numerous attempts by sheriff's deputies and bystanders to round them up before they were roped into custody. (AP Photo/abc15.com) MANDATORY CREDIT.PHOENIX (AP) — Two quick-footed llamas dashed in and out of traffic in a Phoenix-area retirement community before they were captured by authorities Thursday, causing a stir in the streets and on social media.



Obama steps up pitch for trade, exports, targets Democrats

FILE - In this Feb. 20, 2015, file photo, President Barack Obama speaks in Washington. Relying on Republicans and going against the grain of his own party for his legislative successes has not been much of a go-to play in Obama's game plan. Then there's international trade. On Thursday, Feb. 26, Obama stepped up his campaign for expanding exports and negotiating new trade deals in Asia and Europe, a rare spot of common ground with Republicans and a raw point of friction with Democrats. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — Relying on Republicans and going against the grain of his own party for his legislative successes has not been much of a go-to play in President Barack Obama's game plan.



In reversal, Barnes & Noble to keep Nook division

US bookseller Barnes & Noble said Thursday it will retain its struggling Nook division, which produces tablets and digital books, backtracking on a decision from last yearUS bookseller Barnes & Noble said Thursday it will retain its struggling Nook division, which produces tablets and digital books, backtracking on a decision from last year. The company said it would instead spin off its education unit, which sells books on college and university campuses. The spinoff of the education unit is set to be completed by August, a statement said. "Separating Barnes & Noble Education will create an industry-leading, pure-play public company with more flexibility to pursue strategic opportunities in the growing educational services markets," chief executive Michael Huseby said.



'Jihadi John' from Islamic State beheading videos unmasked as Londoner

ISIS executioner "Jihadi John" believed to be London manBy Michael Holden and Mark Hosenball LONDON/WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The masked "Jihadi John" killer who fronted Islamic State beheading videos has been identified as Mohammed Emwazi, a British computer programming graduate from a well-to-do London family who was known to the security services. The black-clad militant brandishing a knife and speaking with an English accent was shown in videos released by Islamic State (IS) apparently decapitating hostages including Americans, Britons and Syrians. The 26-year-old militant used the videos to threaten the West, admonish its Arab allies and taunt President Barack Obama and British Prime Minister David Cameron before petrified hostages cowering in orange jump suits. Two U.S. government sources who spoke on condition of anonymity confirmed to Reuters that investigators believed Jihadi John was Emwazi.



Heat blamed for spray vaccine's failure against swine flu

FILE- In this Oct. 4, 2005, file photo, Danielle Holland reacts as she is given a FluMist influenza vaccination in St. Leonard, Md. The makers of AstraZeneca FluMist spray version of the flu vaccine say now they know why it has failed to protect young U.S. children against swine flu — fragile doses got too warm. The vaccine works well for most flu strains, but small studies found it didn't work very well against the swine flu bug that first emerged in 2009. Swine flu has returned each year since but wasn't a big player this flu season. At a medical meeting Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015, company officials said they investigated and concluded that the swine flu part of the vaccine is unusually sensitive to heat. (AP Photo/Chris Gardner, File)ATLANTA (AP) — The makers of the nasal spray version of the flu vaccine say now they know why it has failed to protect young U.S. children against swine flu — fragile doses got too warm.





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